Guys should know how to carve a turkey.
Position the turkey on a wooden cutting board, cavity side facing you. Use a sharp 8- to 12-in. chef’s knife and make a cut at each thigh; they’ll open up naturally, and you can take them off. Split the leg and the thigh at the joint and put them on a platter. Next, use the tip of your knife to follow the bones on the left wing side, starting on top and working down. Go slow and stay on the bone; don’t go into the meat. The breast comes right off. Repeat on the right side, then lay the breasts on the cutting board and slice them. (Some carvers go for thin, elegant pieces; others prefer thick, hearty slabs.) Arrange the slices artfully on the platter—toss on some parsley sprigs as a garnish—and serve.
Read more: Types of Skills Everyone Should Know – Video – Top 100 Important Skills - Popular Mechanics

Guys should know how to carve a turkey.

Position the turkey on a wooden cutting board, cavity side facing you. Use a sharp 8- to 12-in. chef’s knife and make a cut at each thigh; they’ll open up naturally, and you can take them off. Split the leg and the thigh at the joint and put them on a platter. Next, use the tip of your knife to follow the bones on the left wing side, starting on top and working down. Go slow and stay on the bone; don’t go into the meat. The breast comes right off. Repeat on the right side, then lay the breasts on the cutting board and slice them. (Some carvers go for thin, elegant pieces; others prefer thick, hearty slabs.) Arrange the slices artfully on the platter—toss on some parsley sprigs as a garnish—and serve.


Read more: Types of Skills Everyone Should Know – Video – Top 100 Important Skills - Popular Mechanics
Guys should know that the muck in the Aunt Jemima bottles and Mrs. Buttersworth bottles ain’t maple syrup.

Guys should know that the muck in the Aunt Jemima bottles and Mrs. Buttersworth bottles ain’t maple syrup.

Guys should know the words to Stairway.
There’s a lady who’s sure all that glitters is gold 
And she’s buying the stairway to heaven. 
When she gets there she knows if the stores are all closed 
With a word she can get what she came for. 
Ooh, ooh, and she’s buying the stairway to heaven. 
There’s a sign on the wall but she wants to be sure 
'Cause you know sometimes words have two meanings. 
In a tree by the brook, there’s a songbird who sings, 
Sometimes all of our thoughts are misgiven. 
Ooh, it makes me wonder, 
Ooh, it makes me wonder. 
There’s a feeling I get when I look to the west 
And my spirit is crying for leaving. 
In my thoughts I have seen rings of smoke through the trees 
And the voices of those who stand looking. 
Ooh, it makes me wonder 
Ooh, it really makes me wonder. 
And it’s whispered that soon if we all call the tune 
Then the piper will lead us to reason. 
And a new day will dawn for those who stand long 
And the forests will echo with laughter. 
If there’s a bustle in your hedgerow, don’t be alarmed now 
It’s just a spring clean for the May queen. 
Yes, there are two paths you can go by, but in the long run 
There’s still time to change the road you’re on. 
And it makes me wonder. 
Your head is humming and it won’t go, in case you don’t know 
The piper’s calling you to join him 
Dear lady, can you hear the wind blow, and did you know 
Your stairway lies on the whispering wind? 
And as we wind on down the road 
Our shadows taller than our soul. 
There walks a lady we all know 
Who shines white light and wants to show 
How everything still turns to gold. 
And if you listen very hard 
The tune will come to you at last. 
When all are one and one is all 
To be a rock and not to roll. 
And she’s buying the stairway to heaven.

Guys should know the words to Stairway.


There’s a lady who’s sure all that glitters is gold 

And she’s buying the stairway to heaven. 

When she gets there she knows if the stores are all closed 

With a word she can get what she came for. 

Ooh, ooh, and she’s buying the stairway to heaven. 

There’s a sign on the wall but she wants to be sure 

'Cause you know sometimes words have two meanings. 

In a tree by the brook, there’s a songbird who sings, 

Sometimes all of our thoughts are misgiven. 

Ooh, it makes me wonder, 

Ooh, it makes me wonder. 

There’s a feeling I get when I look to the west 

And my spirit is crying for leaving. 

In my thoughts I have seen rings of smoke through the trees 

And the voices of those who stand looking. 

Ooh, it makes me wonder 

Ooh, it really makes me wonder. 

And it’s whispered that soon if we all call the tune 

Then the piper will lead us to reason. 

And a new day will dawn for those who stand long 

And the forests will echo with laughter. 

If there’s a bustle in your hedgerow, don’t be alarmed now 

It’s just a spring clean for the May queen. 

Yes, there are two paths you can go by, but in the long run 

There’s still time to change the road you’re on. 

And it makes me wonder. 

Your head is humming and it won’t go, in case you don’t know 

The piper’s calling you to join him 

Dear lady, can you hear the wind blow, and did you know 

Your stairway lies on the whispering wind? 

And as we wind on down the road 

Our shadows taller than our soul. 

There walks a lady we all know 

Who shines white light and wants to show 

How everything still turns to gold. 

And if you listen very hard 

The tune will come to you at last. 

When all are one and one is all 

To be a rock and not to roll. 

And she’s buying the stairway to heaven.

Guys should know how to tie a tie.

Guys should know how to tie a tie.

Guys should know where the wild things are.

Guys should know where the wild things are.

The following is the only way to make the perfect martini. Read it. Memorize it. Become one with it. For this, indeed, is the ultimate guide to the good life.
First off, you’ll need a few items:
Ice. Lots of it.
Properly chilled, stemmed martini glasses (Properly chilled means your glasses should be in the freezer for a minimum of one hour prior to making the martini. To avoid confusion, or disaster, I suggest putting said glasses in the freezer and leaving them there permanently.)
Vermouth
A glass pitcher or metal shaker
Garnish, be it olives, or lemon peel. These are the only things, garnish-wise, that are permitted. Sure, you can use things like cocktail onions, but then it isn’t a martini, now is it? The answer is no. It’s a Gibson.
And last, but obviously not least, gin. Pay attention, dear readers. I said GIN. I did not mention raspberries, chocolate, or anything involving butterscotch. Those drinks may be “martini-like”, by virtue of the type glass in which they rest, but the similarity ends right there, buster. And don’t give me any of this James Bond crap about vodka. No! That is not a martini, either. Case closed.
12 Steps to the Perfect Martini
First, grab the vermouth out of the fridge. It needs to be in the fridge, because it’s a perishable item. Take off the cap. Pour the vermouth into the cap. That’s all the vermouth you need.
Now, take the glass pitcher, or metal vessel, out of the freezer, where it, too, should remain.
Put the ice in the container (a healthy handful of cubes, at least seven to eight, in my opinion), and then pour in the vermouth. You want not only to coat the bottom of the shaker/pitcher, but the ice as well. Give it a swirl, and then out it goes, right down the drain. Now, it’s not necessary to shake it to death. A drop or two of vermouth is in proper proportion.
On to the gin, which should be kept in the freezer. Let’s be tasteful here, folks. The contemporary man has been trained by various restaurants and bars that a martini should be somewhere between the size of your noggin and a bowling ball. Nope, nope, nope. Two shots. That’s three ounces. No more. Could be a half oz. less, actually.
At this point, it depends what type of container is in use. If it’s a glass pitcher, you stir. If it’s a metal one, you swirl, in a semi-vigorous manner, but not violently. You want the ice friction to cause a chain reaction of cold, but you don’t want to bruise the gin. Gin needs to be gently introduced to the vermouth, and there MUST be some ice melt dilution. So, swirl, or stir, depending.
At this point, put your container down and your accoutrements away. Find some good music. In my opinion, all this ultra-lounge stuff is fine. Mancini, Julie London, Les Baxter, et. al. I listen to it, too. But, my first instinct is now, and will always be, to go for the Sinatra. Why mess around? After Sinatra, there’s Dean-o, then Sammy. After I’ve exhausted those, then, and only then, will I go for the lounge.
Okay, back to the drink. Swirl it some more.
Now put out something to nosh on. My preference is for good old fashioned cocktail peanuts, spanish-variety if you can find ‘em. It was always good enough for Dad, so it’s what I go with. I think it’s passed on in the genes, actually. Other options are mixed nuts, or even blue cheese on crackers. As long as it isn’t things like goldfish crackers, chex mix, yogurt-covered anything, etc., you’ll be fine.
Back to the drink again. Swirl some more.
Grab the olives out of the fridge. Take your toothpick and push out those nasty little red pimento buggers. Mount up two olives.
Swirl some more.
Strain the concoction into two martini glasses (I say two because martinis need to be drunk in the presence of beautiful women. The same logic goes for the olives. You use two, as Sinatra put it, so there’s one for you, and one for the beautiful gal that’s about to walk in the door.) In go the olives. Out go the day’s troubles.

The following is the only way to make the perfect martini. Read it. Memorize it. Become one with it. For this, indeed, is the ultimate guide to the good life.

First off, you’ll need a few items:

  • Ice. Lots of it.
  • Properly chilled, stemmed martini glasses (Properly chilled means your glasses should be in the freezer for a minimum of one hour prior to making the martini. To avoid confusion, or disaster, I suggest putting said glasses in the freezer and leaving them there permanently.)
  • Vermouth
  • A glass pitcher or metal shaker
  • Garnish, be it olives, or lemon peel. These are the only things, garnish-wise, that are permitted. Sure, you can use things like cocktail onions, but then it isn’t a martini, now is it? The answer is no. It’s a Gibson.
  • And last, but obviously not least, gin. Pay attention, dear readers. I said GIN. I did not mention raspberries, chocolate, or anything involving butterscotch. Those drinks may be “martini-like”, by virtue of the type glass in which they rest, but the similarity ends right there, buster. And don’t give me any of this James Bond crap about vodka. No! That is not a martini, either. Case closed.

12 Steps to the Perfect Martini

  1. First, grab the vermouth out of the fridge. It needs to be in the fridge, because it’s a perishable item. Take off the cap. Pour the vermouth into the cap. That’s all the vermouth you need.
  2. Now, take the glass pitcher, or metal vessel, out of the freezer, where it, too, should remain.
  3. Put the ice in the container (a healthy handful of cubes, at least seven to eight, in my opinion), and then pour in the vermouth. You want not only to coat the bottom of the shaker/pitcher, but the ice as well. Give it a swirl, and then out it goes, right down the drain. Now, it’s not necessary to shake it to death. A drop or two of vermouth is in proper proportion.
  4. On to the gin, which should be kept in the freezer. Let’s be tasteful here, folks. The contemporary man has been trained by various restaurants and bars that a martini should be somewhere between the size of your noggin and a bowling ball. Nope, nope, nope. Two shots. That’s three ounces. No more. Could be a half oz. less, actually.
  5. At this point, it depends what type of container is in use. If it’s a glass pitcher, you stir. If it’s a metal one, you swirl, in a semi-vigorous manner, but not violently. You want the ice friction to cause a chain reaction of cold, but you don’t want to bruise the gin. Gin needs to be gently introduced to the vermouth, and there MUST be some ice melt dilution. So, swirl, or stir, depending.
  6. At this point, put your container down and your accoutrements away. Find some good music. In my opinion, all this ultra-lounge stuff is fine. Mancini, Julie London, Les Baxter, et. al. I listen to it, too. But, my first instinct is now, and will always be, to go for the Sinatra. Why mess around? After Sinatra, there’s Dean-o, then Sammy. After I’ve exhausted those, then, and only then, will I go for the lounge.
  7. Okay, back to the drink. Swirl it some more.
  8. Now put out something to nosh on. My preference is for good old fashioned cocktail peanuts, spanish-variety if you can find ‘em. It was always good enough for Dad, so it’s what I go with. I think it’s passed on in the genes, actually. Other options are mixed nuts, or even blue cheese on crackers. As long as it isn’t things like goldfish crackers, chex mix, yogurt-covered anything, etc., you’ll be fine.
  9. Back to the drink again. Swirl some more.
  10. Grab the olives out of the fridge. Take your toothpick and push out those nasty little red pimento buggers. Mount up two olives.
  11. Swirl some more.
  12. Strain the concoction into two martini glasses (I say two because martinis need to be drunk in the presence of beautiful women. The same logic goes for the olives. You use two, as Sinatra put it, so there’s one for you, and one for the beautiful gal that’s about to walk in the door.) In go the olives. Out go the day’s troubles.
Guys should now how to pleasure a woman.

Guys should now how to pleasure a woman.

Guys should know how to tie a clinch knot. Teach a man to fish and all that.

Guys should know how to tie a clinch knot. Teach a man to fish and all that.